Facing Failure

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Maybe it was when I booked the rooms for our first classes? Or maybe when I started paying out money for insurance, business cards, advertisements and teaching resources? It’s been creeping up on me for a while. The possibility of failure looms ever closer, as I take the steps towards launching Stacey College from idea, to service.

Maybe you are the eternal optimist and don’t have to face these thoughts. Most entrepreneurs though have to face the possibility of failure. Now I’m not saying Stacey College is going to be a failure. Stacey College is going to work, I have no doubt in my mind. But there is a very real possibility that the first two classes we are planning, and promoting, may get no students. My business partner describes it as eliminating options. Thomas Edison famously declared,  “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.  While I am hoping that it does not take 10 000 tries to make Stacey College a success, I know that I must be prepared for this not to be an easy road.

Henry Petroski’s book argues that “time and again, we have built success on the back of failure–not through easy imitation of success“. Petroski is looking at the history of design, but his insights equally apply to so many spheres of life. As a bit of a perfectionist, I am not someone who has traditionally accommodated failure. And yet this new experience of entrepreneurship has freed me to take risks, to face my fears of failure, within an overall framework of positive thinking and determination to succeed in the long run. So as I stare possible failure in the face over the next few months, I will try to remember that this is part of the journey of starting something new.

 

6 replies
  1. Rajneessh Kumar
    Rajneessh Kumar says:

    Dear Kathy,

    You know–How a bank used to get vast customers in good old days?
    By getting their first customer, first……….
    And then second, ……..
    anb then third……….
    and then fourth……..
    and then fifth………..
    and then sixth…………..
    and then seventh………….
    and then eighth………..
    and then ninth…….
    and then tenth………….

    And then 15th………
    And then 20th…………
    And then 30th……….
    And then 50th………. and
    then 100th………
    then 150th………
    then 200th………
    then 300th……….
    then 500th……..

    Aftwerward, you need not to count yourself, your people would be counting it for yourself..

    By the time you reach to this line, you observe that –Have you hastened to reach the end of this comment or you’ve got the message?

    With thanks,

    Rajneesh Kumar

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